iCARE STUDY / THE CENTRAL ROLE OF COLLABORATION

RESOURCES FOR RESEARCHERS AND iCARE COLLABORATORS

The iCARE study is supported by the participation of a large team of international collaborators working in different regions and countries around the world.

The key to halting the rapid spread of COVID-19 is public adherence to behaviour-based prevention policies around the world. Policies have varied greatly between provinces and countries. This study would not be possible without the contributions of our collaborators working in different regions around the world.

Analyses from Survey 1 (March 27 to April 15) on study demographics, perceptions of government policy, health behaviours, adherence to health measures, types of concerns, and adherence motivators (20,537 respondents, 140 countries).

View results and analyses

Learn more about presentations and publications stemming from the iCARE project’s research as produced by the iCARE team’s collaborators from around the world.

View iCARE research presentations and publications

The purpose of the iCARE Study Analysis Plan (iSAP) Log is to serve as a repository of prospective analyses stemming from the work of the iCARE project’s collaborators. The goal is to encourage sharing and collaboration through a collegial and transparent process.

View or submit to the iSAP log

Please invite as many of your personal and professional contacts to participate. The more people complete the survey, the more we learn about the spread and impact of COVID-19.

Learn how you can help us share this survey.

The iCARE study has received a range of local, national and international media coverage. These news stories have helped raise awareness about the importance of researching and understanding population behaviours, particularly when it comes to informing policy and communication strategy. They have also helped promote participation in the survey.

View media coverage about the iCARE Study

The iCARE Study has published a number of infographics to help share findings and analyses stemming from study data. These are available in different languages and can be made available in other languages on request.

We encourage the sharing of iCARE Study infographics on social media and other platforms, including news media and research forums.

Browse iCARE Study infographics

ADDITIONAL INFO FOR COLLABORATORS AND RESEARCHERS

FORMAL STUDY DESCRIPTION

The International Assessment of COVID-19-related Attitudes, Concerns, Responses and Impacts in Relation to Public Health Policies (iCARE) study: Can we optimise strategies to flatten the COVID-19 infection curve?

The iCARE study has been listed (ID #21680) among the COVID-19 Research Tools by the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) of the US National Institutes of Health as part of the NIH Public Health Emergency and Disaster Research Response (DR2).

Background: In the context of a highly contagious virus with no vaccine and no cure, the key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 and successfully transitioning through the phases of the pandemic and into ‘life after COVID’, is public adherence to the unprecedented and rapidly evolving behaviour-based public health policies being implemented around the world. However, adherence to public health policies involves making significant behaviour changes that may come with significant personal, social and economic costs, which may undermine their impact. Further, as we look towards deconfinement, people’s willingness to adhere to new government recommendations (e.g., re: school and store openings) will also be critical for transitioning through the phases of the pandemic and re-engaging the economy. Unfortunately, policies have varied greatly between provinces and countries, contributing to public uncertainty about government policy motives and confusion about which policies to follow. This too may contribute to sub-optimal policy impacts and outcomes. Several complex factors are likely to predict why people adhere (or not) to various public health measures. These factors can be summarized by two complementary behaviour prediction models: (1) The COM-B (Capability, Opportunity, Motivation-Behaviour) model; and the (2) The Health Beliefs Model, which together, provide a framework for understanding the psychological, behavioural, social, and environmental factors that predict behavior change and adaptation. In the context of this unprecedented health, social and economic crisis, where the global need for adherence to public health policies has never been greater, our understanding of the determinants of adherence at each phase of the infection curve in countries around the world is critical for effective policy planning and communication.

The iCARE Study is an ongoing, multi-wave international study of public awareness, attitudes, concerns and behavioural responses to public health policies implemented to reduce the spread of COVID-19, as well as the multidimensional impacts of the pandemic on people around the world. Our goal is to link behavioural survey data with policy, mobility and case data to provide behavioural science, data-driven recommendations to governments on how to optimize current policy strategies to reduce the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada and around the world.

The project aims to address the following research questions:

  1. What are the sociodemographic (e.g., age, sex, gender, ethnicity, parental status, employment/ student status, built environment, healthcare system factors), psychological (e.g., COVID-19 attitudes, beliefs and concerns), behavioural, physical/mental health, and economic determinants of adherence to major COVID-19 public health policies in general, and by country/province?
  2. What are the short and medium-term impacts of COVID-19, including physical and mental health, social, occupational, and economic outcomes, and do they vary as a function of key characteristics (e.g., age, sex/gender, ethnicity, healthcare worker status) in general and by country/province?

Using this data, we will determine (1) Which strategies, launched where, when, and for whom were most (and least) associated with adherence and most (and least) effective at reducing infection rates and mortality and minimizing impacts, in order to provide (2) data-driven recommendations to governments on how to optimize policy and communication strategies to improve policy adherence and health, economic, and quality of life outcomes.

Methods: This is an international multi-wave cross-sectional observational cohort study. Survey data will be collected in monthly waves from May-December 2020 using convenience snowball sampling (globally, 25-30K per wave, n=200-240K total) and parallel representative sampling (in targeted countries, n=1,500 per wave/country, n=81,000), generating data for 8 cohorts of participants that will be added to the first wave cohort launched on March 27, 2020. We have confirmed the collaboration of more than 150 international researchers from 40 countries and the survey is currently available in 36 languages. Survey data will be linked at the country/province-level with Oxford Government Policy Tracker data, Google Mobility data, and Johns Hopkins case/death/recovery data. The primary analyses will be general linear models accounting for time scale (i.e., the date of survey completion) using multilevel modelling software.

Relevance and impact: This study will provide high-quality, accelerated and real-time evidence to support COVID-19 policy strategy and communication in Canada and around the world. The study will leverage an existing online assessment platform, as well as the expertise and resources of 150 collaborators in 40 countries. Survey questions were chosen to enable harmonized data collection and analyses with similar international NIH and WHO studies. A unique strength of the study is the inclusion of low and middle-income countries in global and representative samples. This will help us understand what public health policies and strategies are working, where, and for whom, which can inform policy strategy and communication in real time to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19, and its physical/ mental health, social, economic and quality of life impacts, both locally and around the world.


The iCARE study has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the CIUSSS-NIM (Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux du Nord-de-l’Île-de-Montréal): approval # 2020-2099 / 03-25-2020.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

iCARE STUDY TEAM

Last updated: September 30, 2020

Primary Investigators
Kim Lavoie, PhD University du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) Canada
Simon Bacon, PhD Concordia University Canada
Staff
Geneviève Szczepanik, PhD Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Liza Perez, BSc Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Guillaume Lacoste, BA Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Fanie St-Jean Miron, MSc Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Katherine Séguin, BA Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Ruth Bruno, MSc Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Khiran Armugan, BASc Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Collaborators
Jacqueline Boyle, PhD Monash University Australia
Joanne Enticott, PhD Monash University Australia
Shajedur Rahman Shawon, PhD Centre for Big Data Research in Health, UNSW Medicine Australia
Helena Teede, MD Monash University Australia
Alexandra Kautzky-Willer, MD Medizinische Universität Wien Austria
Arobindu Dash, MS International University of Business, Agriculture & Technology Bangladesh
Marilia Estevam Cornelio, PhD University of Campinas Brazil
Marlus Karsten, PhD Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina – UDESC Brazil
Darlan Lauricio Matte, PhD Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina – UDESC Brazil
Shawn Aaron, PhD Ottawa Hospital Research Institute Canada
Ahmed Abou-Setta, PhD University of Manitoba Canada
Tracie Barnett, PhD McGill University Canada
Silvana Barone, MD Université de Montréal Canada
Ariane Bélanger-Gravel, PhD Université Laval Canada
Sarah Bernard, PhD Université Laval Canada
Lisa Maureen Birch, PhD Université Laval Canada
Susan Bondy, PhD University of Toronto Canada
Linda Booij, PhD Concordia University Canada
Roxane Borgès Da Silva, PhD University of Montreal Canada
Jean Bourbeau, MD McGill University Canada
Rachel Burns, PhD Carleton University Canada
Tavis Campbell, PhD University of Calgary Canada
Linda Carlson, PhD Calgary University Canada
Kim Corace, PhD University of Ottawa Canada
Olivier Drouin, MD CHU Sainte-Justine/Université de Montréal Canada
Francine Ducharme, MD Université de Montréal Canada
Mohsen Farhadloo, PhD Concordia University Canada
Richard Fleet, MD, PhD Université Laval Canada
Gary Garber, MD University of Ottawa, Public Health Ontario Canada
Lise Gauvin, PhD Université de Montréal Canada
Jennifer Gordon, PhD University of Regina Canada
Roland Grad, MD McGill University Canada
Samir Gupta, MD University of Toronto Canada
Kim Hellemans, PhD Carleton University Canada
Catherine Herba, PhD Université du Québec à Montréal Canada
Heungsun Hwang, PhD McGill University Canada
Lisa Kakinami, PhD Concordia University Canada
Sunmee Kim, PhD McGill University Canada
Sandra Pelaez, PhD Université de Montréal Canada
Louise Pilote, MD McGill University Canada
Paul Poirier, MD Université Laval Canada
Justin Presseau, PhD University of Ottawa Canada
Eli Puterman, PhD University of British Columbia Canada
Joshua Rash, PhD Memorial University Canada
Paula AB Ribeiro, PhD Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Mohsen Sadatsafavi, PhD University of British Columbia Canada
Paramita Saha Chaudhuri, PhD McGill University Canada
Jovana Stojanovic, PhD Concordia University Canada
Eva Suarthana, MD, PhD University of Montreal / McGill University Canada
Michael Vallis, PhD Dalhousie Canada
Nicolás Bronfman Caceres, PhD Universidad Andrés Bello Chile
Manuel Ortiz, PhD Universidad de La Frontera Chile
Paula Beatriz Repetto, PhD Universidad Católica de Chile Chile
Mariantonia Lemos-Hoyos, PhD Universidad EAFIT Colombia
Angelos Kassianos, PhD University of Cyprus Cyprus
Naja Hulvej Rod, PhD University of Copenhagen Denmark
Mathieu Beraneck, PhD Université de Paris; CNRS France
Greg Ninot, PhD University of Montpellier, France
Beate Ditzen, PhD Heidelberg University Germany
Thomas Kubiak, PhD Mainz University Germany
Sam Codjoe, MPhil,MSc University of Ghana Ghana
Lily Kpobi, PhD University of Ghana Ghana
Amos Laar, PhD University of Ghana Ghana
Sylvia Fernandez Rao, PhD Indian Council of Medical Research India
Naorem Kiranmala Devi, PhD University of Delhi India
Suzanne Tanya Nethan, MDS ICMR-National Institute of Cancer Prevention & Research, India
Lancelot Pinto, MD PD Hinduja Hospital and Medical Research Centre India
Kallur Nava Saraswathy, PhD University of Delhi India
Dheeraj Tumu, MD World Health Organization (WHO) India
Silviana Lestari, MD, PhD Universitas Indonesia Indonesia
Grace Wangge, MD, PhD SEAMEO Regional Center for Food and Nutrition Indonesia
Molly Byrne, PhD National University of Ireland, Galway Ireland
Jennifer McSharry, PhD National University of Ireland, Galway Ireland
Oonagh Meade, PhD National University of Ireland, Galway Ireland
Gerry Molloy, PhD National University of Ireland, Galway Ireland
Chris Noone, PhD National University of Ireland, Galway Ireland
Hagai Levine, MD Hebrew University Israel
Anat Zaidman-Zait, PhD Tel-Aviv University Israel
Stefania Boccia, PhD Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Italy
Ilda Hoxhaj, MD, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Italy
Valeria Raparelli, PhD Sapienza – University of Rome Italy
Drieda Zaçe, MD, MSc, PhDc Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Italy
Ala’S Aburub, PhD Isra University Jordan
Daniel Akunga, PhD Kenyatta University Kenya
Richard Ayah, PhD University of Nairobi, School Public Health Kenya
Chris Barasa, MPH University of Nairobi, School Public Health Kenya
Pamela Miloya Godia, PhD University of Nairobi Kenya
Elizabeth W. Kimani-Murage, PhD African Population and Health Research Center Kenya
Nicholas Mutuku, PhD University of Kenya Kenya
Teresa Mwoma, PhD Kenyatta University Kenya
Violet Naanyu, PhD Moi University Kenya
Jackim Nyamari, PhD Kenyatta University Kenya
Hildah Oburu, PhD Kenyatta University Kenya
Joyce Olenja, PhD University of Nairobi Kenya
Dismas Ongore, PhD University of Nairobi Kenya
Abdhalah Ziraba, PhD African Population and Health Research Center Kenya
Arunas Emeljanovas , PhD Vilnius University Lithuania
Natalja Fatkulina, Ph.D Vilnius University Lithuania
Brigita Mieziene, PhD Vilnius University Lithuania
Chiwoza Bandawe, PhD University of Malawi Malawi
Siew Yim Loh, PhD University of Malaya Malaysia
Lynda Bavin, PhD University of Auckland New Zealand
Boyd Swinburn, MD University of Auckland New Zealand
Ademola Ajuwon, PhD University of Ibadan Nigeria
Nisar Ahmed Shar, PhD CoPI-National Center in Big Data & Cloud Computing Pakistan
Bilal Ahmed Usmani, PhD NED University of Engineering and Technology Pakistan
Rosario Mercedes Bartolini Martínez, PhD Instituto de Investigacion Nutricional Peru
Hilary Creed-Kanashiro, M.Phil. Instituto de Investigacion Nutricional Peru
Paula Simão, MD S. Pneumologia de Matosinhos Portugal
Pierre Claver Rutayisire, PhD University of Rwanda Rwanda
Abu Zeeshan Bari, PhD Taibah University Saudi Arabia
Iveta Nagyova, PhD PJ Safarik University – UPJS Slovakia
Jason Bantjes, PhD University of Stellenbosch South Africa
Brendon Barnes, PhD University of Johannesburg South Africa
Bronwyne Coetzee, PhD Univeristy of Stellenbosch South Africa
Ashraf Khagee, PhD University of Stellenbosch South Africa
Tebogo Mothiba, PhD University of Limpopo South Africa
Rizwana Roomaney, PhD University of Stellenbosch South Africa
Leslie Swartz, PhD University of Stellenbosch South Africa
Anne Berman, PhD Karolinska Institutet Sweden
Nouha Saleh Stattin, MD Karolinska Institutet Sweden
Susanne Fischer, PhD University of Zurich Switzerland
Debbie Hu, MD, MSc Tainan Municipal Hospital Taiwan
Ceprail Şimşek, MD Health Science University Turkey
Kara Yasin, MD Kanuni Sultan Süleyman Training and Research Hopital, Istanbul, Turkey Turkey
Bilge Uzmezoglu, MD University of Health Science Turkey
John Bosco Isunju, PhD Makerere University School of Public Health Uganda
James Mugisha, PhD University of Uganda Uganda
Lucie Byrne-Davis, PhD Manchester University UK
Paula Griffiths, PhD Loughborough University UK
Joanne Hart, PhD Manchester University UK
Will Johnson, PhD Loughborough University UK
Susan Michie, PhD Univeristy College London UK
Nicola Paine, PhD Loughborough University UK
Emily Petherick, PhD Loughborough University UK
Lauren Sherar, PhD Loughborough University UK
Robert M. Bilder, PhD, ABPP-CN UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine; Jane & Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience at UCLA; and Stewart & Lynda Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA USA
Matthew Burg, PhD Yale University USA
Susan Czajkowski, PhD NIH – National Cancer Institute USA
Ken Freedland, PhD Washington University USA
Sherri Sheinfeld Gorin, PhD University of Michigan USA
Alison Holman, PhD University of California, Irvine USA
Gilberto Lopez, ScD, MA, MPH Arizona State University and University of Rochester Medical Center USA
Sylvie Naar, PhD Florida State University USA
Michele Okun, PhD University of Colorado, Colorado Springs USA
Lynda Powell, PhD Rush University USA
Sarah Pressman, PhD University of California, Irvine USA
Tracey Revenson, PhD Hunter College & the Graduate Center
City University of New York
USA
John Ruiz, PhD University of Arizona USA
Sudha Sivaram, PhD NIH, Center for Global Health USA
Johannes Thrul, PhD Johns Hopkins University USA
Claudia Trudel-Fitzgerald, Ph.D. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health USA
Students
Rhea Navani, BSc Monash University Australia
Kushnan Ranakombu, PhD Monash University Australia
Daisuke Hayashi Neto, BA Unicamp Brazil
Anda Dragomir, PhDc Université du Québec à Montréal and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Amandine Gagnon-Hébert, BA Université du Québec à Montréal and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Claudia Gemme, MSc Université du Québec à Montréal and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Vincent Gosselin Boucher, MSc Université du Québec à Montréal and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Mahrukh Jamil, B. Eng Concordia University and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Lisa Maria Käfer, BSc McGill University Canada
Tasfia Tasbih Concordia University and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Maegan Trottier University of Lethbridge Canada
Ariany Marques Vieira, MSc Concordia University Canada
Robbie Woods Concordia University and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Reyhaneh Yousefi, MD Concordia University and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre Canada
Tamila Roslyakova, MA University of Montpellier France
Lilli Priesterroth Mainz University Germany
Shirly Edelstein Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Public Health Israel
Tanya Goldfrad Meuhedet Israel
Ruth Snir Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Public Health Israel
Yifat Uri Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Public Health. Israel
Mohsen Alyami University of Auckland New Zealand
Comfort Sanuade University of Ibadan Nigeria
Katarina Vojvodic University of Belgrade Serbia
Community Participants
Olivia Crescenzi Canada
Kyle Warkentin, MSc Canada
Katya Grinko, MSc Denmark
Lalita Angne India
Kulka Bharati, MD India
Jigisha Jain India
Nikita Mathur Syncorp Clinical Research India
Anagha Mithe India
Sarah Nethan Community Empowerment Lab India

Updated October 8, 2020

DATA ACCESS OVERVIEW

The iCARE study team encourages open-source data movement and continuous collaboration in order to maximize the scientific value of extensive epidemiological data collected in our study.

As such, the study team is committed to making the iCARE research materials available to all study collaborators. Collaborators can either request direct access to or statistical assistance/analysis of the iCARE study data. For data accessing purposes, a Study Research Materials Distribution Agreement (RMDA) needs to be signed between the Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre (MBMC ) and the Recipient Organization before the formal data release. The RMDA aims to safeguard and protect the confidentiality and privacy of the iCARE participants. It covers survey data as well as the publicly available data that has been collected as part of the iCARE study. It is important to note that no fees will be charged for accessing the iCARE research materials nor for statistical analysis/assistance requests.

In order to facilitate access to data and ensure optimal and timely scientific outputs that are of crucial importance in the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the iCARE study team developed a step-by-step guide for interested research investigators.

View the iCARE Study Data Access Guide

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CONTACT THE iCARE TEAM

If you have any questions about the study, please contact Dr. Kim Lavoie, PhD at covid19study@mbmc-cmcm.ca.